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Tibet Shakti 

back on digital platforms 

https://algromerkhan.hearnow.com/tibet-shakti

https://open.spotify.com/album/1LYtLSICKjUOgWMyVv8PW9

https://music.apple.com/us/album/tibet-shakti/1476282340?app=music&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

https://music.apple.com/us/album/tibet-shakti/1476282340?app=itunes&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/algromerkhan21?SourceCode=HEARNOW

 

 

 

The Tibetan singing bowls resonate harmonic overtones creating a vibrational environment that soothes and heals.

Product Description

“Tibet shakti stems from my years of Shakti worship, the bowls being one of the many ways I have found to draw out the primordial cosmic energy that Shakti represents. Through this minimalistic approach, I invite the listener to discover how to harness that creative power and implement it into one’s life.

I have been experimenting with Tibetan singing bowls since the early 1980s, often in session late into the night with my friend and fellow spiritual seeker, the late Klaus Wiese. These sounds have accompanied me through the years and I have used them for my own meditation practices. Only recently, the idea to share them with fans of my ambient music has occurred to me, and for them to see the power and inspiration that can be derived from these sounds.

In this album, I used a number of Tibetan and Bengali bowls from a large collection—some of which I borrowed from Klaus. I tried many of them out in order to get the overtones right, to make the sound carry, and to correspond with certain Indian ragas (i.e. Bhupali) from the Indian mountain regions.

Singing bowls are made of seven types of metal, mainly comprised of bare metal bronze, which is a unique combination of copper and tin. Most of the bowls that I used were thin-walled and two of them actually have gold in them. The sounds that come alive while playing the bowls immediately leads the listener inward, drawing them from a space of dwelling in the perception of the outside world directly into the most interior space where only a universal oneness exists. The Tibetans have a word for this state—shamatha—loosely translating to ‘peacefully abiding’. The sounds help the listener effortlessly ease into a deeply meditative state, allowing them to be here in the present moment.”

—Al Gromer Khan

Reviews: Retailing Insight – December 9, 2014:

Al Gromer Khan is best known for fusing Indian sitar music with electronics to create exotic, ambient soundscapes. Tibet Shakti is a dramatic departure for him, on which he plays a variety of Tibetan and Bengali singing bowls–and that’s it. The tones and verberations from these instruments impart a sense of deep calm and stillness. In the liner notes, Gromer Khan uses the Tibetan term “shamatha” to describe the effect, which loosely translates as “peacefully abiding”. The artist plays the bowls with patient grace, allowing the tones to intersect and overlap like ripples on a reflecting pond. This is one of the most intimate albums of the year, and I found it utterly relaxing.

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After bestselling Sky Worship

new work In High Places

and at itunes: 

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/artist/al-gromer-khan/64387703

 

​​REVIEW

 AL GROMER KHAN/In High Places:  Inspired by Beatles singing get back to where you once belonged, Khan takes his musical trip back to jump, back to his roots when the cosmos existed only in his head.  Expanding from that inner space, this is no mere hippy dippy noodling.  This is some finely wrought sounds and soundscapes that guide you down the inner path to a place where consciousness exists in its own time zone.  Beyond new age, beyond ambient, this is from whence it all comes from.  Well done.​ (Rasa)​

 http://midwestrecord.com/MWR1525.html   Chris Spector  Midwest Record 830 W. IL. Route 22 #144 Lake Zurich, IL., 60047 

www.midwestrecord.com 

 

 can be ordered at store:

Nine new tracks from Al Gromer Khan

 

IN HIGH PLACES

Presumably, that is what the Beatles meant, all those years ago, when they were singing, Get back to where you once belong. It was never a song about immigrants, it was about one´s individual inner evolution, one´s inner search, one´s own thing. Got to get back there, man.
They´re never a geographic, a physical, location, high places, but Inner states. Just es space music was never about science fiction, but about opening inner spaces via sound, via music. Outside phenomena are an illusion, it is said. Our brothers and sisters from academia will argue: Why, we can measure stuff, and calculate it, do something about it, and use it for purposes, how can it be unreal? True, but it will change: once, and by the most devious of manipulations, you have created the most ideal society, a new generation will come, and they will ruthlessly discard, or perhaps ignore, your thing. That´s when one withdraws, one goes back where one belongs. High places are accompanied by a mood, the mood is one of gratitude, and yes, devotion. The mood, to me, isn´t very much different from falling in love. D´you remember it? That beautiful girl, that sweet boy you fell for then, but who, after time, may not have proved worthy, as it turned out later. But the feeling, the feeling was real.
Sounds give me highs. My instrument sings to me, and for me. There is always that magic moment when it starts doing that, the subtle nuance within the tendril, within the paisley pattern of sound. That thing you can´t fake or manipulate. It works of its own accord, so to speak. And it does not compromise. Split second adjustments don´t make it. To become aware of the stale aftertaste when you´ve accepted things on face value which started to sound wrong, somewhere along the way: That´s your test.

When I compose tracks, I use leftovers from high places I´ve been, where one has found solace and (dare I utter the word?) access to the heart. And then I begin with an idea, a concept. But I will immediately discard it, when that magic moment occurs. And then The Sound wants something from me. Not just anything, but something specific – something special. If that magic moment doesn´t occur, then I won´t use the track. Vilayat Khan the great soul of music, in the 20th century, who´s magic hands made me humble and grateful in an instant. I worshipped those hands for decades. He presented it to me: the Venus Principle: to make something of beauty in any given circumstance, to cook something tasty even from the most unlikely ingredients.

 

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Find on Spotify the music of AGK 

https://open.spotify.com/artist/7sGvSRxJMoJdO530qjic7H

 

 On i-tunes 

https://itunes.apple.com/de/album/durga-avenue/1446941738

 

AL GROMER KHAN

Paisley Music Ambience 

DURGA AVENUE the AGK Autumn-Winter 2018-2019 Ambient Collection

 

DURGA AVENUE – RELEASE SHEET  (from a longer text on Paisley music)

 

Even though Ute and myself consider ourselves of a future tribe, we connect with certain Paisley periods of the past. A specific nostalgia.   In fashion Paisley kept coming and going since the 19th century when Queen Victoria, a fairly simple woman, thought how brilliant it would be to call herself Empress of India. Yes, a sense of nostalgia is always there in my music; it recalls times when things were slow, and refinement and complexity made itself apparent if you´d contemplated it for a time. For example, it has taken more than forty years for my sitar to actually start talking to me.                            

And now she is talking, in a clear but subtle voice. And the voice is that of a woman or a young girl. It sort of changes, but it is always female.  At this time of change, from the age of devotion to that of emancipation, most phenomena in society and art have become male dominated, with all types of self-assertion in the outer world. In my art I succumb to the feminine principle almost totally. That means – as in the Blues – a minimum of structure, as not to hinder Her influence. It also points towards an emotive approach, rather than a rational plan. Technically speaking I follow the overtones from layers of sound and let them – plus certain deja-vus and subtle reminiscences – decide upon all the rest, like structure and harmony.  And by tracing overtones, certain things become manifest. Things one could never have thought of or achieved with willpower. No way. Sometimes She puts an extra beat in, or an extra note, one that disturbs the pre-conceived idea of structured harmony or rhythm. A mistake, but I like to keep it; after all, this is art, and only She can own the natural monopoly for perfection. She loves rhythms based on three or six beat cycles, but she is only truly happy when she is united with Her lover who loves rhythms of four and eight beat cycles . The Two become One. The is dance joyous.  And have you noticed how most African music is based on a beat that intertwines three and four beats? It makes the rhythm hover and float, charging itself energetically, instead of wearing you down like testosterone-prone military marching music or techno.  

 

Sometimes I return to melodic places of the past, places where the heart first opened, and then I make new yogurt from leftovers. No matter, I never wanted – or could – control the muse. I never actually “made” music – always found music.   AGK ©

 review by Sergey Lenkov amazon.co.uk  

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Durga-Avenue-Al-Gromer-Khan/dp/B07LDN7QT2/ref=cm_cr_srp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

 

review by RJ Lannan al_gromer_khan_sky_worship.pdf

 

 

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